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Back to football

I took myself to powerchair football practice yesterday afternoon, not having been in ages. I'm finally making a bit of progress on the film I want to reacquaint myself with the sport. I had forgotten just how much fun it was, to be honest: once I transferred into one of their powerful chairs, I instantly fell in love with the sport again. My eagerness to get this film made was automatically renewed.

Progress on that has been rather slow, but I finally have a fairly solid treatment written, and all the right interested parties. I had a good coffee-meeting wit Sharon on Thursday, who had the wonderful idea of somehow tying the skatepark into it. It looks like this idea of mine could get off the ground pretty soon, and I have a good feeling about it. It may have taken a bit of time, but everything seems to be falling into place so that the world can finally be introduced to the incredible, adrenaline-filled sport of powercharr football.

The skatepark is open

I just got back from the opening of the skatepark. My intention to film it turned out to be a non-starter, as we couldn't get our hands on the camera equipment in time. It is a shame, because it was quite a cool event. The various bigwigs were there, of course, and the place was bustling with chatter, music and the sound of skateboard wheels. Going by what I just saw, I now seriously doubt the reservations a few of the locals have about the park will ever materialise.

I just went onto the park for the first time, just to see how accessible it was in my chair: some parts are okay, but other ramps are simply too steep. In particular, there is a large, curved skate-pit which I didn't dare going anywhere near, and which I can see becoming quite a nice pond if it rains heavily enough. It's quite a nice day out there now though, apart from a fairly stiff breeze, so I'll probably go back out there soon. I may not have been able to get the footage I wanted today, but, from the looks of it, there will be plenty of other opportunities.

Already Skating

The new scatepark opens in Charlton Park tomorrow. I was just in there, and kids are already skating on it. I must say, it looks really impressive, and the tricks some of the skaters were doing were very cool. It isn't even open yet, but I can tell that this park is going to be well used: having cost so much, one would certainly hope so. What I just saw, the amount of activity that was going on already, certainly gave me cause for optimism though. Expect a full account of the park's grand opening on here tomorrow, and after that who knows how much fun I'll be able to get out of it.

Meeting Dan at Waterloo

Yesterday was another day which reminded me how cool this city is. I went up to the South Bank to meet up with my old school friend, Dan. We met at Waterloo and then spent a couple of hours in the gallery at the Royal Festival Hall. Some of the artwork there is amazing. We talked quite a bit: Dan writes too, and we were discussing how to best express ourselves as disabled men, belonging to a section of society the mainstream, by and large, completely ignores. It was good to hear his opinions on stuff. I also updated him on progress on the Powerchair Football film, as Dan plays on the team. We had a (soft) drink, and said goodbye intending to hook up again soon.

Then, the weirdest, coolest thing happened: I was in Waterloo station trying to find the Jubilee Line to get home, when who should I bump into but Claire, the very person from Chocolate Films with whom I've been liaising to try to get the film made. How cool is that! She put me in the right direction and asked me to email her. It was only a brief, fleeting meeting, but it could make all the difference. Where but in a metropolis like London could something like that happen? God, I love this city!

Why 'To Kill A Mocking Bird' Is Being Banned in the deep south

I studied To Kill a Mockingbird at school, and it remains one of my favourite books. Although I never got around to finishing reading it's sequel, I still cherish TKAM as one of the texts which helped make me who I am. The image of Atticus Finch standing up to the racist mob come to lynch Tom Robinson is one I still draw strength from, so to discover here that some schools in the American deep south now want to ban it disturbs me greatly. They say they don't like the use of the N-word, or produce a load of other bullshit excuses; but it's clear they just don't like how it portrays the white majority as being in the wrong.

This is part of a frightening trend in the States - the resurgence of white dominance over any other minority. They want to get rid of anything which might show them in a bad light, and distain anything attacking their bigotry, past or present, as 'liberal propaganda'. It's as if, inspired by the embarrassment to humanity they currently call a president, these poor, poorly educated, disenfranchised white zealots want to recapture the power they once had as the dominant group, and still think they are entitled to. Thus they want to get rid of anything which opposes bigotry or speaks up for equality. Such people perhaps even think the mob was in the right and should have lynched Tom, simply for having the audacity to make love to a white girl. It's very scary: first books like this will be taken off reading lists; pretty soon figures like Martin Luther King will start to be attacked.


[Edited 18/10/2017 at 11:21:07 - addad a bit]