curve
curve

Contents

Home

Weblog Archive

My CV

Contact me

Essays

Tagwall

Links

curve
curve
curve
curve

Links

My us and them entry

best blond joke ever

Lyn's site

Lynrock

curve
curve
curve
curve
Valid CSS! Valid XHTML 1.1! rss 2.0 feed atom 0.3 feed
curve
curve
Communication Works 2017

Today was Communication Works 2017, and I think it's fair to say that it has been quite a day. I got there nice and early, just as everyone was setting up their stalls. It was in a big sports hall, to one side of which were doors opening on to an area with a small shack. In there they were projecting short films, one of which was my Thousand Londoners film. Close by was a table with folders containing some of my writing. I felt quite flattered to be featured so highly.

In the main hall were stalls exhibiting all sorts of the latest communications technology. It was incredibly interesting. I hadn't been there long when my friend Matt arrived to help me film some of it. I'd had the idea of making a film on the event a few days ago; it seemed the best way for me to contribute. We spent a couple of hours getting footage of the stalls and exhibitors, as well as going in to some of the seminars. I think we now have the makings of an excellent film, which I'll edit together soon.

Lyn popped in an hour or two into the event, and we had a fascinating time looking at everything. Mid-afternoon, the three of us popped out for a coffee; L and M stayed at the cafe, while I went back to see the event to it's end. I just got home, rather tired and hot, but glad to have been, and excited what the communication world comes up with by next year.

Archer

Yesterday in the park we touched upon my liking for Bond, as we had just heard the sad news about Roger Moore. Chivon, who works at the cafe there, recommended an animated series called Archer. She said it was a bit of a Bond spoof, but it was very funny and she and her friends were into it in a big way. I just looked up the first episode on Youtube - I had to pay to watch it - and she was right. It isn't a direct spoof of Bond in my opinion, but there are witty, knowing references. It is quite dirty, yet very clever indeed. I also find the style of animation very interesting indeed. When chivon said it was a cartoon, I was expecting something for children; archer definitely is not for kids, although not in the sense that South Park is a cartoon which isn't for kids. I can certainly see myself getting into it. Before I comment on it much further, though, I better go watch more episodes.


[Edited Yesterday at 13:34:14 - Added a bit ]

Rest in peace Sir Roger Moore

Lyn and I just got in from a lovely long walk over to Greenwich. While out, though, I via my iPad learned of the sad death of Sir Roger Moore. I just want to note how sad I find this news: the opening of The Spy Who loved Me is one of my favourite pieces of film; and although I wasn't especially taken with Moore's Bond versus the others (see this entry), it is unarguably true that he helped make the series what it is. More to the point, today we have lost a fine actor and a great gentleman - a true legend. It seems only fitting that I direct you here, albeit with a heavy heart. Indeed, nobody did it better.

A despicable act

I think back to those moments when the curtain came down for the final time at the end of all the awesome gigs I've been to. There's that feeling of elation at having been there; you feel so privileged, and vow to yourself never to forget it. It's a special moment - I'm usually already trying to decide what to write on my blog. That's what those guys in Manchester must have been feeling last night; wondering how best to get to the exit, and then the world suddenly becomes a chaos of screaming and panic.

How can anyone perform such an act? How can anyone intentionally cause such harm and distress on people so young? That's what I don't understand. They chose that very specific, unique moment after the gig had just come to an end, presumably to cause as much suffering as they could. Sometimes you simply have to despair at the depravity people are capable of.

The first proper day of summer

Yesterday really was a lovely day. It felt like the first proper day of summer. After Lyn had opened her presents, we took a stroll down to the river. We'd arranged to meet the guys we usually see at the cafe at The Anchor and Hope, but they strangely never showed up. After an hour or so there, we walked along the Thames for a while, the sun beating down. Then we came back up through the various parks, beautiful in the sunshine, to Charlton Park.

The evening saw a real treat: a barbecue! Mitch had suggested it earlier in the day, and we agreed wholeheartedly. We sat out in the garden and listened too music while he grilled sausages and fish in the open air. The smell was wonderful.

Then something truly touching happened. We could hear kids playing next door; they were getting more and more boisterous, as I think they could smell the sausages. However, they then started to throw stones over, so Mitch went round to tell their mum as it was quite dangerous. The stone-throwing stopped shortly after, and we thought that was an end to it.

A short while later though, our neighbour came round with the two young boys - they were hardly more than five or six - to apologise. We were touched: we explained that it was no problem, just a bit dangerous given Lyn and I were sat out there in the sun. I then added that we were out there celebrating L's birthday, and they wished her happy birthday.

After that we went in to eat. I had a huge plate of bangers and some of the most delicious mash I had ever eaten. It was so enormous I couldn't eat it all. After that we went back out to enjoy the remaining sunshine, but it was then that our neighbours returned. The boys had quickly made birthday cards for Lyn. It was truly humbling, truly special - we were so touched. For our neighbour to have those boys create those cards at such short notice, so quickly, could not have been that easy. It was an incredible end to an amazing day, reminding me that there are still good people in the world who care about what happens in it.